1. Anonymous said: could being a fussy eater (ill eat maybe 10% of the things in my familys pantry, probably less) be related to autism sensory stuff?

    if the fussiness is caused by hypersensitivity to texture and taste, yes. figuring that out is easier said than done, though, because I was older than 20 before I realized that that was why I have so much trouble with food.

    - metapianycist

     
  2. 01:41 20th Jul 2014

    Notes: 92

    Reblogged from darknephilim

    Anonymous said: This might not be the best place to ask this but anyway: I got into an argument with a person with autism because they said something incredibly racist and then they tried to defend themselves with "people with autism can't be racist. it's in the list of symptoms." I did some googling and couldn't find any real validity on this statement. Is this true and I'm just not looking hard enough?

    darknephilim:

    autisticproblems:

    That person is lying and is using their autism to get out of being accountable for their racism.

    While I haven’t been to the WrongPlanet forums myself, I have heard that it’s pretty common to find autistic men there who say that they consider themselves anti-feminist because autism prevents them from having empathy for women—which may be what the person arguing with you is trying to argue, with respect to racism.

    This is poor reasoning, because empathy is not the only way a person can come to think that misogyny (or racism, or any systemic prejudice) is bad—and it’s also been found that reason is a vastly more powerful motivator than emotion for people involved in fighting injustice.

    Autistic people are absolutely not immune from absorbing the prejudices of the culture around them, and to think we are reinforces the “autistic angel” stereotype. We’re not angels. We’re people. And people can absolutely be horrifically prejudiced assholes.

    - metapianycist

    Just recently I observed a bunch of autistic people trying to “reclaim” ableist slurs to hurl at people with learning disabilities, so autistic people are not above critique in our actions. We can learn bad or good things, so using our autism to try to get out of being accountable for bad things such as ableism and racism is actually something that happens frequently and is highly unfortunate and highly abusive.

    ^ important commentary

     
  3. magicalgirlwandamaximoff said: I'm doing some research into autism because I have aspbergers and I'm trying to figure out the difference between aspbergers and autism because a lot of sources I've found have conflicting information or are just autosomal $peaks garbage

    (I am a little entertained that your autocorrect decided that “autism” is not a word and that you must have meant “autosomal.”)

    The diagnostic criteria for Autistic Disorder and for Asperger’s Syndrome in the DSM IV are the same except for that a diagnosis of Asperger’s Syndrome requires that you did not have a speech delay.

    The two diagnoses were combined into Autism Spectrum Disorder in the DSM 5 because whether or not a person has a speech delay doesn’t really affect outcomes or predict how verbal the person is as an adult. There are no measurable clear-cut differences in actual abilities between autistic adults who had a speech delay and those who did not.

     
  4. Just a note: I am completely okay with any fellow autistic people asking me for advice on this blog. I’m also completely fine with non-autistic folks asking questions, as long as you’re respectful. If you want a private response, that’s fine too.

    A response might take a while though, since I’ll be afk a lot.

    - metapianycist

     
  5. Anonymous said: My friend's has a new girlfriend who happens to be autistic. She keeps asking me to affirm her transphobia (I am trans). Every time I deny her opinions, she tells me that I must be wrong. If I try to back up my side with personal anecdotes, crime stats, ect, she curls up and seems to shut down. This has been happening for months now, every time I see her. The entire friendgroup claims "she can't handle strong emotion" so I should just deal w it, but I'd like to educate her, any advice? Thanks

    Wow, that sucks a lot. I can assure you as an autistic trans person that this person definitely sounds like she’s using her autism as an excuse to not examine her prejudices, and it’s really gross that your friend group is taking a “she can’t help it because she’s autistic!” position too, which is enabling her behavior.

    I have had personal experience with interacting with another autistic person who was unaccepting of my gender identity. He, an autistic cis man, had a lot of difficulty with the fact that I was breaking the “rules” of gender by being trans. As I’ve said before, it’s really common and easy for autistic people, just like everyone else, to pick up the prejudices that don’t target them from the culture around them.

    I think what helped this particular autistic cis man eventually come around to respecting me was when others explained to him that the “rules” of gender as had been taught to him were actually wrong, and that he was being extremely hurtful by continuing to refer to me as the wrong gender. In this case, he didn’t realize how hurtfully he was behaving.

    In your case, I think that the shutting down when confronted with criticism makes things a little different. She is very emotionally entangled with her opinions on a subject (trans people) that doesn’t even involve her. Lots of non-autistic people are emotionally invested in being correct, as well, so the emotional entanglement by itself has nothing to do with autism.

    If she is actually having shutdowns when confronted with the possibility that she could be wrong about trans people, then I think you (or someone) should point out to her that that happens, and ask her how to go about constructively criticizing her without her having a shutdown.

    If you can prevent yourself from showing much emotion during conversations with her where you’re pointing out that she’s wrong, that might help, but I know that it’s really hard to do that, and you probably don’t have an investment in personally being friends with her.

    I think that the best thing to do would be to explain to your friend group that they’re wrong about autism (informing them of the things I wrote above). You can tell them an autistic trans person told you so.

    (any fellow trans autistics who want to reply or reblog with additional comments/advice are welcome to do so!)

    - metapianycist

     
  6. Anonymous said: This might not be the best place to ask this but anyway: I got into an argument with a person with autism because they said something incredibly racist and then they tried to defend themselves with "people with autism can't be racist. it's in the list of symptoms." I did some googling and couldn't find any real validity on this statement. Is this true and I'm just not looking hard enough?

    That person is lying and is using their autism to get out of being accountable for their racism.

    While I haven’t been to the WrongPlanet forums myself, I have heard that it’s pretty common to find autistic men there who say that they consider themselves anti-feminist because autism prevents them from having empathy for women—which may be what the person arguing with you is trying to argue, with respect to racism.

    This is poor reasoning, because empathy is not the only way a person can come to think that misogyny (or racism, or any systemic prejudice) is bad—and it’s also been found that reason is a vastly more powerful motivator than emotion for people involved in fighting injustice.

    Autistic people are absolutely not immune from absorbing the prejudices of the culture around them, and to think we are reinforces the “autistic angel” stereotype. We’re not angels. We’re people. And people can absolutely be horrifically prejudiced assholes.

    - metapianycist

     
  7. 04:24 17th Apr 2014

    Notes: 15

    to everyone reacting to the ask from Tuesday and saying “you CAN be racist against white people!!!”

    no, you can’t. I will not allow this blog to be a platform for white people to claim that people of color (justifiably) mistrusting white people has the same potential for cultural harm as hundreds of years of abuses by white people against various groups of people of color.

    i will not use the word “racism” on this blog to describe racial prejudice against white people. end of story. this is not up for debate.

    - metapianycist

     
  8. Anonymous said: Excuse me, but the last anon is a moron. You CAN indeed be racist towards white people. RACIST means you do not like a CERTAIN RACE. If you think only black people are victims of racism, then you're an ignorant prick that needs to open their eyes. Oh, and also, I am black myself. Just to get that straight.

    i like how you read my response and assumed that by poc i meant “black people only”

    and also how you’re casually throwing around the word “moron” (information about its origin in eugenics here) at an autistic person

    very good job, grayface

    [/sarcasm]

    - metapianycist

    #ableist slur tw #slurs tw

     
  9. 16:53 15th Apr 2014

    Notes: 3

    Tags: Anonymous

    Anonymous said: cool uh could you not publish stories in which calling someone a "stupid white woman" is portrayed as racist? it's rude, but it's not racist, you cannot be fucking racist against white people. you should not include this fuckery on this site b/c it looks like you don't care about advocacy for everyone. i'm saying this as a white woman who is on the spectrum. the story itself was important but that part should be removed

    this blog is run by multiple individuals. I don’t know if I was the one who published that (it was five months ago), but if I was (which is pretty likely), I am sorry for my oversight. I fixed the post in question and made a note in it.

    - metapianycist

     
  10. Employee of Morley’s Chicken makes fun of autistic boy with stammer

    Yesterday (22nd November), an employee of Morley’s Chicken in Brockley, London made fun of a seven-year-old boy with autism, who was trying to order food. The man mocked the way that the young boy spoke, poking fun at his slight stammer. His mother complained, only to be told by the manager that it was ‘none of [his] business’. She demanded her money back and as she was leaving, the employee called her a ‘stupid white woman’.

    This is wrong on so many levels. The employee was rude and prejudiced! The manager did absolutely nothing about it. They should not be allowed to get away with this disgusting behaviour.

    As someone with autism, I know only too well how difficult it can be to communicate. If this had happened to me, I would be deeply upset, as was this young boy and his mother. Many people take something as ‘simple’ as being able to communicate with others for granted.

    You can show your support by joining the Facebook group, and reblogging/tweeting/sharing this story.

    —-

    edit 04/15/14: removed the part describing the employee as racist, because it has nothing to do with the point here, AND “racism against white people” is just not a thing. there isn’t systematic discrimination against white people by poc that has any cultural power to affect white people’s lives.